Attached Proton Test, an 'APT' experiment for structural elucidation

Attached Proton Test, an 'APT' experiment for structural elucidation

A key step towards elucidating structures with NMR spectroscopy is the assignment of signals to specific groups within the molecule being analyzed. Two experiments, DEPT (Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer) and APT (Attached Proton Test), are typically used to aid this process with 13C NMR spectra.1 Both experiments are similar in that the number of attached protons (i.e. the multiplicity) is revealed by the phase of the 13C NMR signals. The key difference between the DEPT and APT experiment is that signals for quaternary carbons are observed in the APT experiment.

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How strong was your coffee this morning?

How strong was your coffee this morning?

Who doesn’t want to start the day with a warm cup of coffee? Coffee has a stimulating effect on humans because of its caffeine content and for that reason it has become one of the most popular drinks in the world. Some clinical studies actually suggest that small amounts of caffeine everyday might be beneficial for adults. In this blog I am going to highlight an experiment done in collaboration with the Swager group at MIT using an organometallic complex to quantify the caffeine content in regular coffee without sample preparation!

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To D2O or not to D2O?

To D2O or not to D2O?

In the average case one can simply dissolve an analyte in an appropriate deuterated solvent and acquire a simple 1D spectrum to obtain all the required structural information.  However, sometimes doing so may not provide you with all of the information you need!  It is not uncommon to encounter labile proton peaks in functional groups such as alcohols, amines, amides, and carboxylic acids. 

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