Lead NMR Spectroscopy

Lead NMR Spectroscopy

For many years tetraethyl lead was used as the principal fuel additive to enhance the octane rating of gasoline. In the mid-1970s the use of this substance was reduced because of the environmental hazards of lead and because it poisons catalytic converters. Nowadays, the main application of lead metal and lead oxide is in lead-acid batteries. In this application the cathode of the cell consists of lead dioxide packed on a metal grid and the anode is composed of lead metal. The electrochemical reaction is shown in the following equation:

Read More

Unlocking the Key to Enzymes: Studying Enzyme Kinetics

Unlocking the Key to Enzymes: Studying Enzyme Kinetics

By virtue of its quantitative nature, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly becoming the method of choice to monitor a reaction and determine its kinetic parameters. We’ve demonstrated the ability of the NMReady-60 to monitor a reaction and subsequently extract kinetic parameters in a previous blog post. In this blog post, I’d like to show how the NMReady-60 can be used to study enzyme kinetics. Adapted from a Journal of Chemical Education article published by Olsen and Giles, the enzymatic hydrolysis of N-acetyl-DL-methionine by porcine acylase was studied.

Read More

Spine disease? No, just a rigid backbone, but it keeps from flippin’ the ring!

Spine disease? No, just a rigid backbone, but it keeps from flippin’ the ring!

For this one I must begin with a little personal background information due to my special relationship to the scaffold of the target compound. During my diploma thesis I investigated gold(I) phosphine complexes as catalysts for the intermolecular hydroamidation of olefins.[1] I found that dinuclear gold complex showed superior reaction times and yields compared to mononuclear complexes, like Ph3PAuCl. This particular dinuclear complex [xantphos(AuCl)2] (1) was kicking the reaction of norbornene (2) and tosyl amide (3) and made my first academic publication possible (scheme 1).

Read More

Eat Your Heart Out Mass Spec: Measuring 10B/11B Isotopic Ratio by NMR Spectroscopy

Eat Your Heart Out Mass Spec: Measuring 10B/11B Isotopic Ratio by NMR Spectroscopy

As I’m sure the readers of this blog know, NMR spectroscopy is used widely across all branches of chemistry due to its powerful structure elucidation capabilities and the inherently quantitative nature of the technique.  Organic relies primarily on 1H/13C  experiments where as inorganic chemistry can expand to other nuclei, like 31P and 11B.  However, there are many other applications for NMR other than just structural elucidation.  Perhaps a lesser known application of NMR spectroscopy, is its ability to determine the isotopic ratio of elements! In this blog post I would like to demonstrate a novel method to determine the 10B/11B isotopic ratio using our NMReady-60e and 1H NMR spectra! 

Read More

To apodize or not to apodize - the age old question

To apodize or not to apodize - the age old question

Are you familiar with the Apodization tool in Mnova? Apodization (also referred to as Weighting or Windowing) literally translates to ‘cutting off the feet’ from the original Greek. In this case, the ‘feet’ are the leakage or wiggles that appears when the NMR signal rapidly decays to zero. As such, apodization can enhance the resolution or the sensitivity (S/N ratio) in the spectrum and even remove truncation artefacts after data has been collected. This function is particularly useful for spectra acquired on a benchtop NMR instrument due to the lower S/N ratio compared to spectra collected on high-field instruments.

Read More

A bright application…

A bright application…

BODIPY dyes, which are boron difluoride compounds supported by dipyrrinato ligands, have gained recognition as being one of the more versatile fluorophores due to their superior photophysical properties.[1,2] BODIPY derivatives are used as stable functional dyes in several fields such as light harvesters, laser dyes, fluorescent switches, and biomolecular labels.[3-6] They gained popularity as biological probes due to the easy modification of the ligand framework, extension of the chromophore, and substitution of the fluorine atoms.6 Figure 1 shows some commercially available BODIPY dyes used as biological probes.

Read More

To D2O or not to D2O?

To D2O or not to D2O?

In the average case one can simply dissolve an analyte in an appropriate deuterated solvent and acquire a simple 1D spectrum to obtain all the required structural information.  However, sometimes doing so may not provide you with all of the information you need!  It is not uncommon to encounter labile proton peaks in functional groups such as alcohols, amines, amides, and carboxylic acids. 

Read More

'Hop' off the Diagonal: COSY spectrum of α-humulene

'Hop' off the Diagonal: COSY spectrum of α-humulene

NMR spectroscopy is by far the most useful characterization technique in organic chemistry, especially if you have to elucidate the structure or configuration of your products. Arguably, 2D experiments such as COSY, HSQC, and HMBC have simplified this task tremendously. In this post I wanted to highlight the COSY of α-humulene. 

Read More

The lightest metal with a heavyweight demand: Lithium

The lightest metal with a heavyweight demand: Lithium

Before the early 1950’s lithium was an ingredient found in Seven-up®; however, after concerns by the FDA it was removed from this popular beverage. Interestingly, about the same time it was found that lithium had antipsychotic properties, but it was only approved for human consumption in the 1970’s.[1] Despite being such a simple molecule lithium carbonate is still the most effective drug for the treatment of bipolar affective disorder! We don’t hear this side of the lithium history very often. In recent years this element has become very popular and its demand has increased considerably due to its widespread use in batteries for small electronic devices such as smart phones and laptops.[2]

Read More

A watched pot never boils… how to monitor reactions the easy way!

A watched pot never boils… how to monitor reactions the easy way!

When monitoring reaction progress for determination of reaction kinetic parameters, NMR spectroscopy has increasingly become the method of choice. The ease in which one can calculate the concentration changes of a substrate being consumed or a product being formed over time, directly from peak integration are the reason behind this.

Read More