Unlocking the Key to Enzymes: Studying Enzyme Kinetics

Unlocking the Key to Enzymes: Studying Enzyme Kinetics

By virtue of its quantitative nature, NMR spectroscopy is increasingly becoming the method of choice to monitor a reaction and determine its kinetic parameters. We’ve demonstrated the ability of the NMReady-60 to monitor a reaction and subsequently extract kinetic parameters in a previous blog post. In this blog post, I’d like to show how the NMReady-60 can be used to study enzyme kinetics. Adapted from a Journal of Chemical Education article published by Olsen and Giles, the enzymatic hydrolysis of N-acetyl-DL-methionine by porcine acylase was studied.

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Spine disease? No, just a rigid backbone, but it keeps from flippin’ the ring!

Spine disease? No, just a rigid backbone, but it keeps from flippin’ the ring!

For this one I must begin with a little personal background information due to my special relationship to the scaffold of the target compound. During my diploma thesis I investigated gold(I) phosphine complexes as catalysts for the intermolecular hydroamidation of olefins.[1] I found that dinuclear gold complex showed superior reaction times and yields compared to mononuclear complexes, like Ph3PAuCl. This particular dinuclear complex [xantphos(AuCl)2] (1) was kicking the reaction of norbornene (2) and tosyl amide (3) and made my first academic publication possible (scheme 1).

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Prioritize These Qualities When Investing in NMR Technology

Prioritize These Qualities When Investing in NMR Technology

Richard Ernst first demonstrated Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT NMR) in 1966. His procedure quickly replaced prior scanning techniques. And while NMR applications have expanded greatly since this technology's initial inception, it's important to know how to buy an NMR for sale that will meet your facility's specific and growing needs. With that in mind, here are just a few qualities to prioritize when shopping for an NMR for sale.

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Automation, Benchtop NMR and Industry

Automation, Benchtop NMR and Industry

Since it was discovered, the typical trend in NMR Spectroscopy has been towards higher field, evidenced by the rapid replacement of permanent magnets with supercons.[1]  Why?  Well, NMR Spectroscopy, of course, is one of the most information rich molecular spectroscopic techniques available, providing information of the type of nuclei, the number of those nuclei and even how they’re connected.  As you move to higher field you can immediately observe two things: 1) it’s easier to extract the aforementioned information because the resolution is better (i.e., more Hz/ppm dispersion) given the more favourable dispersion and 2) the data has inherently higher signal-to-noise ratio. 

 

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